Doodling is a funny thing. Some people do it to alleviate stress, some people do it without thinking whilst on the phone or chatting with friends, and some people have become so adept at it that they’ve built a successful career off the back of it. Luminaries like author Sunni Brown and the visualisation team at Eyeful use doodling as a bridge to span the gap between great content and engaging communication. Doodling is the seemingly haphazard foundation of strong visual communication, notably within business presentations. Its beauty lies within this haphazard approach. Without free form creativity and a sense of freedom, every visual slide would be a version of a SmartArt diagram – uninspiring, laboured and not particularly effective.

It’s for this reason that the offices at Eyeful Towers are strewn with screwed up pieces of doodle paper. Okay, we may give it a slightly fancier name and call it ‘visualisation’, but great visualisation starts with an appreciation of the art of doodling. We’ve taken it further and installed entire whiteboard walls for customers, training delegates, consultants and designers to doodle on. In short, we love to doodle.

So why don’t more people doodle? The reality is that, like dancing or singing, most people doodle when nobody’s looking. It’s a personal thing… and doesn’t feel like work. In short, doodling doesn’t feel particularly serious or grownup.

We want to change that so today on, National Doodle Day, we implore you to stop being so precious about those doodles and embrace your inner doodler. Make sure that when you’re preparing your next presentation, step away from PowerPoint and preformatted template and embrace the simple pleasure of pencil and paper. Take time to free your mind and allow yourself to doodle in a way that you’ve never doodled before.

Go on… you’ll love it. And if your boss asks that you’re doing, assure them that from innocent doodles come great visual messages.

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